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Review RevUU Spring 2021

Finding Wit in Worry: A Review of Jenny Offill’s Weather

by Annick Smithers In an interview with The Guardian, Jenny Offill expresses a feeling regarding the climate crisis familiar to many of us: why aren’t we more concerned about it? This disconnect between knowing what’s to come and policies seemingly lacking any sense of urgency is what inspired Offill’s latest novel, Weather – a must-read […]

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Review RevUU Spring 2021

This Mournable Body by Tsitsi Dangarembga: An intense imagination of the self in the other

By Kris van der Voorn Imagine that you choose to read a story featured on the Booker Prize Shortlist. You decide to read Mengiste, or perhaps Cook. As you search for the right title however, you read about Tsitsi Dangarembga’s imprisonment due to a protest that calls on reform in Zimbabwe. You read that This […]

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Review RevUU Spring 2021

Op zoek naar vervangende tekens voor rouw: Een recensie van Emma van Meyerens Ook ik ben stukgewaaid: Essays over rouw

Design: Kris van der Voorn Door Jane Singer Het boekje is klein, dun, en voelt licht in mijn hand, terwijl het onderwerp zo zwaar lijkt. Ook ik ben stukgewaaid: Essays over rouw is een bundel van drie essays over herinneringen, rituelen en rouwpatronen. Het boek beschrijft zichzelf als “een collectie van notities over aanhoudende rouw”. De essays bieden […]

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Review RevUU Spring 2021

“You just want our blood on this floor” Review of Namina Forna’s The Gilded Ones

By Alyssa Vreeken Namina Forna’s literary debut hit the shelves in February. With my thesis handed in and birthday around the corner, it seemed like perfect timing — except that my favourite bookstore was closed due to Covid, and also wasn’t receiving recent publications for their click and collect due to Brexit. In other words, […]

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Review RevUU Autumn 2020

How to Distinguish Rape From Romance

A review of Kate Elizabeth Russell’s My Dark Vanessa By Bou Laam Wong If someone were to ask me how I’d describe Vladimir Nabokov’s controversial novel Lolita, I would say it’s another example of a tragic tale about a young girl’s loss of innocence told through the voice of her rapist. There are plenty of […]

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Review RevUU Autumn 2020

Breasts and Eggs, Pen and Paper

A review of Mieko Kawakami’s Breasts and Eggs By Elena Schnee I am a woman, I am a mother, I am a writer  Have you ever heard of a woman giving birth to a book? No? But what is actually the difference between creating new life and creating a new work of art? How are […]

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Review RevUU Autumn 2020

“No Right”

A review of Douglas Stuart’s Shuggie Bain By Ella van Driel “The day was flat.” – Douglas Stuart This is the first sentence that greets you in Douglas Stuart’s first novel Shuggie Bain. The novel starts with “Shuggie” Bain living alone in a dingy bedsit in Glasgow in 1992. Sweet and short, this first sentence feels […]

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Review RevUU Autumn 2020

A Dazzling Debut of Literary Inclusivity

A review of R.B. Lemberg’s The Four Profound Weaves By Kris van der Voorn Don’t worry about transphobic, sexist, or racist writers anymore: the new generation is here, and they are taking down every notion we have of privileged hierarchies. A breath of fresh air is blowing through the literary scene, and amidst it is […]

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Review RevUU Autumn 2020

Pop Culture, the Bush Era, and Aliens

A Fun but Flawed Love Letter to the 2000s By Leda Serikoglu In her debut novel Axiom’s End, the first in a five-book series, Lindsay Ellis rewinds the clock to an alternative autumn of 2007: George W. Bush is still the President of the United States; the Iraq War still hammers on; but now the […]

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Review RevUU Autumn 2020

Covid-1918

A review of Emma Donoghue’s The Pull of the Stars  By Renske Rademaker Emma Donoghue’s The Pull of the Stars takes place during a pandemic, but it is not the pandemic one might expect from a novel published in 2020. The novel depicts three days in the life of Dublin nurse Julia Power amidst the […]