Flowers for Robin: A Review of Richard Powers’ Bewilderment

By Joppe Kips   After his previous novel The Overstory received the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2019, I found myself wondering where Richard Powers might take us next. Having themed his novels around subjects such as brain disorders, the First World War, the Holocaust, and eco-activism, it was safe to say that the subject of hisContinue reading “Flowers for Robin: A Review of Richard Powers’ Bewilderment”

A Review of Michaela Coel’s Misfits: A Personal Manifesto

By Kathelijne Schoonackers Michaela Coel’s star has been rising ever since she arrived on the television scene in 2015 with Chewing Gum, a show she wrote and starred in. After this, she landed roles in Black Earth Rising and Been So Long, before writing and starring in the impactful I May Destroy You in 2020. In between winning BAFTA’s and an Emmy for Chewing Gum and I MayContinue reading “A Review of Michaela Coel’s Misfits: A Personal Manifesto”

About The Last House on Needless Street…: At Least it Isn’t Cats (2019)

By Chantal Groot Read it! It’s got a rave review quote from the King,  apps [Name Withheld], who has known me since the late 1990s, those dying halcyon days of the  EXTREME youth generation, when we devoured anything and everything dark and violent  because Fuck Society™. Stephen King was/is the King of Horror, Master of Psychological Thriller, inspirer of decent-to-great film  adaptations and mediocre-to-godawful miniseries. [Name Withheld] mistakes my lack of instantaneous response for apathy (unaware that I am illegally texting while cycling) and goes for broke: It’s a murder mystery narratedContinue reading “About The Last House on Needless Street…: At Least it Isn’t Cats (2019)”

Why Patricia Lockwood’s No One is Talking About This Is a Must Read

By Paula Werdnik She opened the portal. ‘Are we all just going to keep doing this till we die?’ people were asking each other, as other days they asked each other, ‘Are we in hell?’ Patricia Lockwood’s No One is Talking About This is unique, unconventional, witty, and cynical; it captures the zeitgeist of ourContinue reading “Why Patricia Lockwood’s No One is Talking About This Is a Must Read”

In the Tradition of Perceiving Women: A Review of Virginia Feito’s Mrs. March

By Juliette Huisman It can easily be assumed that, whilst reading our fair share of novels, most of us have been able to recognise ourselves in one or two characters that we have come across. Whether we recognise certain mannerisms, laugh along with a character that has the same sense of humour as us, orContinue reading “In the Tradition of Perceiving Women: A Review of Virginia Feito’s Mrs. March”

Death Among the Tealeaves: TJ Klune’s Under the Whispering Door

By Tara Huisman Warning: The following review contains spoilers. Under the Whispering Door is a book about death, but it’s not a book about dying. T.J. Klune’s latest book tells the story of Wallace Price: a cold and uncaring lawyer, who only in death realises that he hasn’t truly lived. What follows is a tale of grief, love, andContinue reading “Death Among the Tealeaves: TJ Klune’s Under the Whispering Door”

A Painfully Captivating Novel About Death, Grief, and Acceptance: Review of TJ Klune’s Under the Whispering Door

By Judith Revenberg Contains mentions of death, mental health, and suicide (& spoilers)  Earlier this year, I was introduced to an author whom I now call one of my favourites: TJ Klune. The book that won me over was The House in the Cerulean Sea (2020), a novel  filled with gentle dialogue and endearing characters about learning to accept others and simultaneously yourself.  Consequently, it was a no-brainer that when Klune’s most recentContinue reading “A Painfully Captivating Novel About Death, Grief, and Acceptance: Review of TJ Klune’s Under the Whispering Door”

The Rewards of Rereading: A Review of Anuk Arudpragasam’s A Passage North

By Eva Soares Since the Booker Prize announcement on the third of November, we know who has won this year’s prize, namely Damon Galgut with  The Promise. I also know who should have won the 2021 Booker prize. The criteria for choosing a winner are sparse and vague. Officially, the only criterion is for a novel to be considered the bestContinue reading “The Rewards of Rereading: A Review of Anuk Arudpragasam’s A Passage North”

Blue, I love you: Three Letters To the Colour Blue

By Anna Sóley Ásmundsdóttir I           u        Bluuuuuuue  u                u     ue                  ue                              uuuuue  Songs are like tattoos  (Mitchell)  Thoughts flow through my mind one after another, and sometimes a few at a time, both intertwined and independent. They form a musical cacophony that one would think impossible, except if one complements the other. A melody complements a lyric, but only oneContinue reading “Blue, I love you: Three Letters To the Colour Blue”

In Moonland: The Inevitable Influence of the Past

By Sanne Tukker **This review contains spoilers for Miles Allinson’s In Moonland. ** At times nothing can be more tempting than living in the past. Memories can have such a magnetic pull that it can feel impossible to steer away from them. I too am familiar with yearning for a past that is unattainable. Just before the start of the pandemic IContinue reading “In Moonland: The Inevitable Influence of the Past”